Waterloo, Belgium

Waterloo - Napoleon’s Last Battle

Waterloo is the place in Belgium, where Napoleon lost the battle against the allied troops commanded by the Duke of Wellington and the Prussian Marshal Blucher in June 1815.

Waterloo attractions are one of the most popular reasons travelers and tourists come to Brussels. Located just south of Brussels, Waterloo highlights include The Wellington Museum, St. Joseph’s Church and multiple battlefield attractions.

Wateloo, Belgium
The Battle of Waterloo puts an end to the tyrant rule of Napoleon as the emperor of France. It had also marked the end of the hundred days of Napoleon from exile return. The battle was regarded as an influential battle of all time marking the Bonaparte’s last and Waterloo Campaign.

When Napoleon was returned to power in 1815, plenty of states had opposed his comeback. Since then, the Seventh Coalition was formed and armies began to mobilize. There are two huge forces assembled near the northeast border of France. These forces were under the command of Blucher and Wellington.

When Napoleon was returned to power in 1815, plenty of states had opposed his comeback. Since then, the Seventh Coalition was formed and armies began to mobilize. There are two huge forces assembled near the northeast border of France. These forces were under the command of Blucher and Wellington. Napoleon - Waterloo, Belgium

Napoleon had planned to attack the said forces before they can unite with the other members of the Coalition in coordination of France invasion. The three-day engagement of the Waterloo Campaign happened in the Battle of Waterloo on June 16-19, 1815. The Battle of Waterloo was quoted by Wellingtons as the “nearest run thing you ever saw in your life”.

Waterloo Battle Map - Waterloo, Belgium The French army consisted around 69,000 soldiers with 250 guns, 7,000 artilleries, 14,000 cavalries, and 48,000 infantries. To fill in the ranks of the French army throughout the rule, Napoleon had used conscription but he did not conscript men for the campaign in 1815.
All of the troops in the French army were veterans and had been already involved in one or more campaign already.
Wellington admitted that he had inexperienced, ill-equipped, very weak, and infamous staffs in his army. His troops only consisted of 67,000 soldiers with 150 guns, 6,000 artilleries, 11,000 cavalries, and 50,000 infantries. 24,000 of the soldiers in the troop were British and another 6,000 were from the King’s German Legion. All of the British soldiers in the troops were regular soldiers wherein 7,000 of there where veterans of the Peninsular War. In addition to Wellington’s army there were 3,000 soldiers from Nassau, 6,000 from Brunswick, 11,000 from Hanover and 17,000 Dutch troops.
On the morning of June 18, the two armies faced off against each other.
Wellington - Waterloo, Belgium
Waterloo Battle - Waterloo, Belgium However the incessant rains of the previous days had soaked the ground to a muddy quagmire hampering the movements of men, horses and artillery. This postponed the battle until midday when Napoleon opened up with an artillery barrage. The fighting seesawed back and forth throughout the day with high casualties on both sides.
Towards evening Wellington’s exhausted troops seemed on the verge of breaking, but the timely arrival of the Prussians reinvigorated their efforts and doomed Napoleon.
Napoleon fled to Paris where he abdicated for a second time on June 22 and was exiled to the desolate island of St. Helena in the mid-Atlantic.

In 1820, the Netherlands’ King William I ordered the construction of a monument on the spot where it was believed his son, the Prince of Orange, had been wounded.
The Lion’s Hillock, a giant Mound, was constructed here, using 300,000 cubic meters (390,000 cu yd) of earth taken from the ridge at the centre of the British line which effectively removed the southern bank of Wellington’s sunken road.

Lion Mound - Waterllo, Belgium Lion's Hillock - Waterloo, Belgium

Apart from the Lion Mound, there are several more conventional but noteworthy monuments scattered throughout the battlefield.

Monument of King’s German Legion - Waterloo, Belgium Monument of King’s German Legion - This monument was erected in honor of the Hanoverians of the King’s German Legion that died in the defense of La-Haie-Sainte.
Gordon’s  Monument - Waterloo, Belgium Gordon’s  monument was built in 1817 in the honour of lieutenant-colonel Gordon, by his family. This officer died in the head-quarters of Wellington, his leg having been blown off by a cannon ball.
Monument of the Belgians - Waterloo, Belgium Monument of the Belgians - This monument for the Belgian soldiers of both sides, fallen on 18 june 1815 was erected in 1914.
French Monument - Waterloo, Belgium The French dead monument named “The Wounded Eagle”.

First unveiled in 1912, the Panorama of the Battle of Waterloo, on an immense 110 m. long by 12m high circular painting portraying scenes from the battle fought on 18 June 1815.

Waterloo Battle Panorama - Belgium Waterloo Battle Panorama - Belgium

The Wax Museum  the main protagonists have been immortalized in wax figures, made by artists from the Musee Grevin in Paris.
A copy of Napoleon’s death mask could be seen here, despite much mystery and controversy, surrounding the origins and whereabouts of the original cast molds.

Waterloo Wax Museum - Belgium Waterloo Wax Museum - Belgium

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Map of Waterloo, Belgium

Waterloo, Belgium

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